Seakeeper Ride | Mechanical Installation Manual

1. Introduction

This document is intended to give details and guidance to a boat builder or equipment installer on the proper procedure for the installation of the Seakeeper Ride system.

Because of the quantity of parts and careful installation requirements, set aside a clean, well-ventilated workspace, take inventory of necessary tools and parts, and review the entirety of this manual before setting to work. To gain a broad understanding of the installation process, read the Installation Overview.

The instructions in this manual should be repeated for both the port and starboard Controllers.

Figure 1 – Seakeeper Ride Installed

2. Safety Notices

2.1 Stability

This system is not intended, nor should it be expected, to provide underway dynamic stability beyond the limits of the hull itself. It is up to the captain of the vessel to ensure that the hull is maintained and operated in a safe manner, within the limits defined by the manufacturer.

2.2. Forces Applied to Hull

While underway, the Controllers transfer high forces at each of the mounting locations. Careful consideration should be given to the transom strength and condition to ensure it can hold the loads created by the Controllers.

2.3. Installation Personnel

It is assumed that the installer is familiar with bonding using high-strength adhesives to marine structures and has thoroughly inspected the transom where the Controllers are mounted to ensure it can withstand the loads the Controllers create while deployed at speed. If the installer has any doubt about the ability of the transom to support the loads, they should contact a licensed naval architect or marine engineer to do a structural analysis.

The installer should review the full installation manual and associated drawings to ensure the installation procedure is fully understood.

2.4. Installation Tools

Use a properly calibrated torque wrench for final tightening of all bolts per this manual. Improper torque application to fasteners may cause damage to the system.

Unless otherwise specified, use a thread locking sealant activator/primer and apply a medium strength thread locking sealant to all fasteners prior to installation.

3. Tools Needed

  • Drill
  • Dual Action Sander
  • Oscillating Tool or Hacksaw
  • Torque Wrench
  • Socket Set (13 mm required)
  • Phillips Head Screwdriver
  • Hex Bit Sockets (2.5, 4, 5 & 6 mm required)
  • Hex Wrenches (Allen Keys) (2.5, 5 & 6 mm required)
  • Adjustable Wrench
  • Squeegee, Putty Knife, or Tongue Depressor
  • Digital Protractor
  • 6-12 in. Straight Edge
  • 3 ft Straight Edge
  • Drill Bits or Hole Saw in Sizes 3/32 in. (2.4 mm), 9/64 in. (3.6 mm), 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) & 23/32 in. (19 mm)
  • Methacrylate Cartridge Gun
  • High Strength Methacrylate Adhesive (Plexus MA590 is recommended)
  • Marine Adhesive Sealant (3M 5200 is recommended)
  • Masking Tape
  • 60 Grit Sandpaper
  • Medium Strength Thread Locking Sealant (Permatex 24010 is recommended)
  • Thread Locking Sealant Activator/Primer
  • Acetone or Denatured Alcohol
  • Clean Gloves (recommended)
  • Plain White Paper Towels

4. Inventory Parts

Please review all parts included before proceeding. The following figure and table describe all parts included in the assembly. Review parts and ensure all parts are present before starting the installation procedure.

  1. Blade
  2. Seal Plate
  3. Actuator
  4. Actuator Plate
  5. 3 Degree Wedge Plate
  6. 4 Degree Wedge Plate
  7. 5 Degree Wedge Plate
  8. Transom Plate
Figure 2 – Controller and Cable Routing Inventory
  1. Cable Gland Tube
  2. Cable Gland Nut
  3. Outer Cable Guide
  4. Inner Cable Guide
  5. Cable Support Guide

Table 1 – Mechanical Installation Hardware

Wedge Pack HardwarePositioning Screws








M8-1.0 x 30 mm Button Head Bolt




M8-1.0 x 50 mm Button Head Bolt

M8-1.0 x 60 mm Button Head Bolt

M8 Half Cylinder Washer




M8 Cylindrical Nut






Phillips No. 8 x 1.5 in. Screw
Seal Plate HardwareBlade Hardware

M6-1.0 x 30 mm Socket Head Cap Screw

M6 Washer

M6-1.0 x 16 mm Flat Head Socket Cap Screw

M8-1.25 x 20 mm Hex Head Screw

M8 Washer
Cable Routing Hardware

Phillips No. 8 x 0.75 in. Screw

Phillips No. 8 x 1.5 in. Screw

5. Identify Installation Location

Installation Location Introduction

The performance of the Seakeeper Ride system is a direct result of the proper mounting location of the Controllers. It is vital to abide by the criteria in the Seakeeper Ride Installation Location Guide to choose the optimal mounting point for the Controllers.

For new production installations, please consult with the Seakeeper Applications Engineering Team or a naval architect for the proper location of the Seakeeper Ride Controllers according to the hull shape, hull type, engine configuration, and other relevant application details.

For refit installations, please review the following sections to determine the ideal location for the Seakeeper Ride Installation.

5.1. Longitudinal Location

The Seakeeper Ride Controllers will be mounted to the transom, the approximately vertical surface at the aft end of the running surface, as shown in Figure 3 and Figure 4.

Figure 3 – Longitudinal Location for Seakeeper Ride Controller Installation with Bracket
Figure 4 – Longitudinal Location for Seakeeper Ride Controller Installation without Bracket

5.2. Vertical Location

Seakeeper Ride’s Controllers must be mounted so that the bottom surface of the Seal Plate (Item Number 2 in Figure 5) aligns with the hull bottom. The goal is to have the Seal Plate acting like an extension of the hull bottom. The Seal Plate’s location is determined by the Transom Plate (Item Number 8 in Figure 5), which is affixed to the transom and adjusted up and down during installation to allow for fine-tuning the location.

Figure 5 – Seakeeper Ride Controller Constituent Parts

1) Blade

2) Seal Plate

3) Rotary Actuator

4) Actuator Plate

5) 5 Degree Wedge Plate

6) 4 Degree Wedge Plate

7) 3 Degree Wedge Plate

8) Transom Plate

The Ride Reference Line (RRL) provides a guideline for the vertical location and orientation of the Seakeeper Ride system while considering many possible hull features. This section of the guide demonstrates how to find the RRL with different hull features.

The RRL is the intersection of the hull bottom and the transom planes, ignoring filleting or radiuses at the intersection. The hull bottom plane can be approximated by holding a long straight edge (3 ft [0.9 m]) flush with the hull bottom, parallel to the centerline. The transom plane can be approximated similarly by holding a short straight edge (6” [0.15 m]) flush with the transom.

Figure 6 – Straight Edges on Hull Bottom and Transom

An example transom with an exaggerated radius is shown below. The RRL is shown in blue and is the intersection of the two straight edges.

For optimal performance, the Seal Plate must be in line with the RRL and the bottom of the hull. The Seal Plate can be above the RRL up to 1/8 in. with negligible effects on system performance. If the Seal plate is more than 1/8 in. above the RRL or below the RRL at all, a significant negative impact on the performance of the system will result.

Figure 8 – Acceptable Vertical Variance

Figure 10 to Figure 13 in the following section show a view from the stern of the vessel looking toward the bow. Label 1 indicates the bottom of the hull, Label 2 indicates the RRL, and Label 3 indicates the outline of the Transom Plate.

Figure 9 – Demonstration of View

Strakes

For hulls with lifting strakes or spray strakes, the strake can be ignored during installation. The RRL, in this case, is defined as the intersection of the hull bottom and transom plane on either side of the strake, as shown below.

Figure 10 – Strakes on Hull Bottom with RRL and Transom Plate Trace

Concave and Convex Deadrise

The Seal Plates (Item Number 2 in Figure 5) have a straight design. Some hulls may have curvature along the deadrise which will cause the Seal Plate to show gaps between the deadrise at either the ends or center of the plate. The following sections describe how to find the RRL in concave and convex deadrise hulls.

Concave Deadrise

For vessels with concave curvature, the Seal Plate should be mounted such that the center of the Seal Plate is flush to the hull bottom and the ends of the Seal Plate are equidistant from the hull bottom (measurement A in the figure below). Measurement A must be 0.5 in. or less. For vessels with concave curvature, the RRL is defined as the tangent to the hull bottom, shown by the blue line.

Figure 11 – Concave Hull Bottom RRL and Transom Plate Trace

Convex Deadrise

For vessels with convex curvature, the ends of the Seal Plate should be mounted flush with the hull bottom with a gap between the center of the Seal Plate and the hull bottom (measurement B in the figure below). Measurement B must be 0.5 in. or less. For vessels with convex curvature, the RRL is defined as the straight line along the transom between inboard and outboard ends of the seal plate’s destination.

Figure 12 – Convex Hull Bottom RRL and Transom Plate Trace

Variable Deadrise

Variable deadrise hulls are those where the running surface has breaks that run longitudinally. Generally, these hulls have decreasing deadrise angle in each successive panel moving outboard from centerline. Seakeeper Ride Controllers are capable of being mounted on variable deadrise hulls, so long as the distance from inboard edge of the Controller to the hull (Dimension A in the figure below) is 0.75 in. (19 mm) or less. This requirement only applies to vertical changes beneath the Controller. In hulls with a variable deadrise, the RRL is the highest portion of the deadrise that the Seakeeper Ride system will cover. See Figure 12 for this position. Because performance may degrade at vertical changes between hull sections greater than 0.75 in. (19 mm) (Dimension A), please reach out to Seakeeper for guidance in this instance.

Figure 13 – Variable Deadrise Hull RRL and Transom Plate Trace

5.3. Beam-Wise Location

There are several hull features that should be considered when determining the location of the Controllers in a beam-wise orientation. Generally, the Controllers should be mounted as far outboard as possible, up to the chines (if the hull has chines).

Engine Spacing

Because the Controllers have the potential to change water flow into the boat’s propellers, the Controllers should be mounted as far from the propellers as possible.

The distance discussed in this section is measured along the deadrise of the hull when viewing it from the stern, as illustrated in Figure 13.

Figure 14 – Distance Between Controller and Propeller

The Controllers can be mounted as close as 3 in. (76 mm) between the inboard edge of the Controller and the outboard diameter of the propeller tip. In the figure above, D represents the measurement between the Controller and the outboard diameter of the propeller tip, and Label 4 indicates the diameter of the propeller tip.

Chines

Based on the considerations of engine spacing and transom appendages, some installations will require the Controllers to extend outboard of the inboard edge of the chine, as shown below.

An overlap of the outboard chine of 1.5 in. (38 mm) is acceptable.

For overlaps greater than 1.5 in. (38 mm), performance may degrade rapidly. Please consult with Seakeeper for specific installations where chine overlap may be greater than 1.5 in. (38 mm).

Figure 16 – Chine Overlap

Hull Side Spacing

It is possible to have an installation where the Controller is mounted too far outboard causing water flowing around the hull side to interfere with the Controller and substantially reduce performance.

To avoid this issue, the Controller should be mounted at least 1.5 in. (38 mm) inboard of the hull side, as shown below.

Figure 16 – Hull Side Clearance

5.4. Overhead Clearance

Because the Controllers are mounted externally on the hull, there may be some installations where space must be cleared to create room for the Controllers. There must be at least 5 in. (127 mm) of clearance between the aft most running surface and any surface above where the Controller will be placed (this includes any bracket or similar hardware that hangs over the Controller). This clearance height is represented by H in the figure below. The Controller will extend aft of the hull by 8 in. (203 mm).

Figure 17 – Overhead Clearance of Controller

5.5. Loading and Storage Details

The Controllers should not be installed where they will carry any load of the boat while on bunks (i.e. a trailer, storage rack, or fork truck). If this is a concern, the Controllers may be mounted up to 1/8 in. up from the bottom of the hull to increase the longevity of the system. See Figure 8.

5.6. Asymmetrical Details

Many boats are not perfectly symmetrical about the centerline, resulting in subtly different mounting locations and angles for each Controller. This is acceptable and may require different Wedge angles used for port and starboard Controllers. Following this guideline for the correct installation location will result in a proper installation even if there are asymmetries in the hull.

5.7. Cable Entry

In the final details of the installation, the cable that powers and drives the Controllers must pass through the transom of the hull. The location for cable penetration will be based on available access to the transom on the interior.

Concealed Cable Entry

The preferred cable location is through either of the oval holes of the Transom Plate (highlighted in blue in Figure 18). To utilize either location, you must be able to reach the hole from the inside to tighten the supplied cable gland and prevent water ingress into the hull.

Figure 18 – Transom Plate Internal Routing Oval Holes

As an example for internal routing, the figure below depicts a stringer shown with dotted lines that is preventing use of the inboard cable penetration. In this example, the outboard cable pass-through is available as indicated by the blue arrow. This can only be used if there is access on the interior side of the penetration.

Figure 19 – Cable Penetration Through Transom Plate

Exposed Cable Entry

Locations outside the Transom Plate can be used as well. If the cable penetration location is below the waterline, the supplied cable gland must be used to ensure a watertight hull after the penetration.

This cable penetration method can be used in locations above the waterline as well.

Cable Lengths

In all cases, the supplied cable for the Controllers is limited to 10 ft (3 m). Carefully consider the cable routing and location of the Distribution Module to ensure both cables can connect to the Distribution Module.

6. Measure Transom Angle

Measure Transom Angle Introduction

Seakeeper Ride Controllers must be mounted as close to parallel with the running surface of the hull as possible, as explained in Section 5. This portion of the installation is to measure the angle at the chosen locations. The Wedge Pack Assembly (Items 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 in Figure 5) allows for the adjustment of the Controllers to the boat’s transom angle. The figure below illustrates the differences in the angle between the aft end of the running surface and the transom (A) and the resulting effects on Wedge Pack selection (B). The top two images show correct angle adjustments. The bottom two images show incorrect angle adjustments.

Figure 20 – Different Transom Angles and the Effects on Seakeeper Ride’s Geometry

For optimal performance, the Seal Plate must be completely flush with the aft end of the running surface of the boat, which will eliminate angle C in the figure above. The Seal Plate can angle upward up to 2 degrees with a negligible effect on system performance. If the Seal Plate angles upward more than 2 degrees, or if the Seal Plate angles downward at all, a significant negative impact on the performance of the system will result.

Figure 21 – Seal Plate Acceptable Angle

6.1. Measurement Steps

  1. Using the selected Controller locations from Section 5, measure the angle with a digital protractor from the running surface to the transom, perpendicular to the deadrise. See the figure below for an example of the measurement on the port Controller, outboard location.
  2. Measure the inboard and outboard ends of the port Controller area and use the larger angle in the following Sections. Round up to the nearest degree.
  3. Measure inboard and outboard ends of the starboard Controller area and use the larger angle in the following Sections. Round up to the nearest degree. Note: It is possible to find different angles between port and starboard side of the hull.
Figure 22 – Measuring Port Side, Outboard, Transom Angle
  1. Determine the number of wedges required for each Controller’s Wedge Pack using the transom angle measured in previous sections and Table 2 – Transom Angle and Wedge Plates.

The transom and Wedge angles indicated in the Table 2 are the maximum range of the product. If the boat’s transom angle is outside the range of Table 2, do not add or remove more wedges to accommodate the different angle. Contact Seakeeper to determine the best course of action.

Table 2 – Wedge Plates Based on Transom Angle

Wedge Plates
Measured Angle3 Degree4 Degree5 DegreeTop Bolt Length
112°150 mm
111°150 mm
110°150 mm
109°260 mm
108°1160 mm
107°1160 mm
106°1160 mm
105°260 mm
104°1260 mm
103°11160 mm
102°1260 mm
101°1260 mm
100°21160 mm
99°2260 mm
98°11260 mm
97°2260 mm

6.2. Hulls with Unique Stern Features

For many planing hulls, the aft portion of the running surface is straight, however, there can be exceptions where there is a curvature, angle, or twist just forward of the transom. This may be referred to as a stern wedge, hook, or rocker. These types of features are generally added the hull to improve handling characteristics or induce a constant trim, adding a bow down moment during normal running conditions.

Be sure to use a 3-ft (0.9 m) straight edge along the hull bottom when evaluating the transom angles to obtain a correct assessment of the running surface.

If the Seal Plate were to be installed following the same angle as a stern wedge, it would create a permanent additional upward force in the aft of the boat, and the bow would be pushed down irreversibly. This incorrect assessment for installation is demonstrated below.

Figure 23 – Incorrect Assessment of Running Surface

Measure the angle of the transom over a greater length of the running surface up to 3-ft (0.9 m) to ensure the proper angle.

Figure 24 – Correct Assessment of Running Surface with an Extra Long Straight Edge

7. Assemble Wedge Pack

Assemble Wedge Pack Introduction

This portion of the installation will require the Wedge Pack hardware kit illustrated in Section 4.

7.1. Determine Wedges to Use

Based on Table 2 and the transom angle determined in Section 6, compile the Transom Plate, Actuator Plate, Wedge Pack Hardware kit and appropriate wedges for port and starboard. It is possible that the hull has different angles for each location.

  1. Stack the proper number of Wedge Plates on top of the Transom Plate using the tabs and grooves on the Wedge Plates shown below to keep them in the correct orientation. There are matching tabs on the Transom Plate to assist with alignment.
  2. Place the Actuator Plate on top to complete the Wedge Pack Assembly.
Figure 25 – Locking Tabs and Groves of Wedge Plates.

7.2. Bolt Parts Together

Note: Before bolting parts together, check to make sure that none of the hardware on the back side of the Actuator Plate has fallen out during shipping or handling (highlighted below in blue).

Figure 26 – Hardware Inserts on Back of Actuator Plate
  1. Place a cylindrical washer on each bolt, with the flat side on the head of the bolt.
  2. Apply thread locking sealant activator/primer and thread locking sealant to bolts.
  3. Install the five (5) M8 x 30 mm bolts in the bottom of the Transom Plate, as shown below (The 600 mm Controllers will have seven [7] bolts.)
  4. The top two (2) M8 bolts must be selected based upon the total Wedge Plates in use. If the Wedge Plates are combined to be greater than, or equal to, 5 degrees, use the 60 mm bolts in the top of the Transom Plate. If the Wedge Plates are combined to be less than 5 degrees, use the 50 mm bolts in the top of the Transom Plate. See Table 2.

Note: Be sure to use the correct bolt length. Incorrect bolt length may result in insufficient thread engagement or the inability to attach the Seal Plate in later steps.

  1. Place cylindrical nuts over the ends of the screws on the Actuator Plate and torque to 75 in-lbs (8.5 N-m) in an alternating pattern.
Figure 27 – Wedge Pack Assembly

8. Prepare Hull

Prepare Hull Introduction

Note: In Section 8 there are different levels of preparation recommended to the installer based upon the age and history of the boat. For new construction where the transom laminate has not been modified or repaired, follow all sections except for Section 8.6. For old construction where the transom laminate has been modified, repaired, painted or otherwise compromised, follow all sections except for Section 8.5.

8.1. Trace Template Outline

Figure 28 – Wedge Pack Assembly in Line with RRL and Hull Bottom

Based on the selection criteria from Section 5 for mounting location, hold the Wedge Pack to the transom in the designated location. Use a straight edge to align the Actuator Plate with the RRL (shown in blue above) and the bottom of the hull. Two people should be available for this section to make holding and tracing easier and more consistent.

  1. Using a marker or pencil, trace the outline of the Transom Plate on the transom.
  2. Trace three (3) mounting hole (keyhole) locations while the Transom Plate is in place.
  3. Trace out cable entry oval holes.
Figure 29 – Tracing Transom Plate on Hull
Figure 30 – Final Trace n Hull

8.2. Drill Holes

  1. Drill pilot holes for each of the three (3) positioning screws highlighted in the figure below using a 9/64 in. (3.6 mm) drill bit. The screws will be installed such that they are extending off the transom approximately 3/4 in. (19 mm). Drill the holes at the highest available position of the keyhole slot, as shown below.
Figure 31 – Positioning Screw Locations on Transom Plate
Figure 32 – Drill Location in Keyhole

8.3. Wipe Area with Solvent

Using acetone or denatured alcohol and a plain white paper towel, wipe the area down to remove surface contaminants.

8.4. Mask Area with Tape

Mask the area surrounding the Transom Plate with tape to protect the surrounding gelcoat or paint, as shown below. Mask all surfaces below the Ride Reference Line, such as spray strakes.

Figure 33 – Masked Off Transom Plate Location

8.5. Sand New Construction Only

Note: For new construction where the transom laminate has not been modified or repaired, follow this section. For old construction where the transom laminate has been modified, repaired, painted or otherwise compromised, skip to Section 8.6.

Sand down the gel coat with 60 grit sandpaper to remove the gloss surface. You may use a Dual Action Sander (DA), but you must be extremely careful not to remove excess material.

Note: It is important not to change the shape of the transom and to stay within the perimeter of the Transom Plate.

8.6. Grind Old Construction Only

Note: For old construction where the transom laminate has been modified or repaired, follow this section.

  1. If the transom in question has been repaired or modified in any way that would compromise the gel coat to fiberglass bond in the region of the Controller installation, please contact a structural engineer or naval architect to ensure the structure in way of the Controller is suitable for installation. If the structure is deemed acceptable for installation, continue through the following sections.
  2. Grind the area where the Transom Plate is to be mounted, using 60 grit abrasive pad or Dual Action Sander. Remove the outer layers of paint, gel coat, or fairing to reveal the fiberglass beneath.
Figure 34 – Using a DA Sander to Remove Paint and Gel Coat
Figure 35 – Gel Coat Removed

8.7. Insert Positioning Screws

Insert the No. 8 x 1.5 in. positioning screws leaving the head to stand off the hull about 3/4 in. (19 mm). Note: These positioning screws provide no structural purpose and will not support the weight of the Actuator. These screws are intended to assist with installation only and are not meant to handle any forces created by the Controller.

Figure 36 – Positioning Screws Inserted

9. Test Fit

Test Fit Introduction

To ensure proper fit of the equipment, the Seal Plate must be temporarily installed.

Note: While test fitting, verify that the nuts receiving the bolts are lined up correctly. Pay particular attention to the square nuts on the sides or ‘wings’ of the Transom Plate.

9.1. Test Fit the Seal Plate

  1. Hang the Wedge Pack on the positioning screws. Align the bottom surface of the Wedge Pack Assembly with the deadrise as indicated in Section 5.
  2. When aligned, tighten the positioning screws to hold the Wedge Pack in place.
  3. Add the Seal Plate to the assembly to check its position as indicated in Section 5. Insert the six (6) M6-1.0 x 30 mm bolts and washers to hold the Seal Plate, as shown below. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] bolts and washers.) Note: Apply thread locking sealant, but do not apply the final torque during this step.
Figure 37 – Seal Plate Test Fit
Figure 38 – Seal Plate Alignment Check
  1. Using a straight edge, verify that the Seal Plate is parallel with the hull bottom in the desired location as shown above. Due to different hull shapes and features, the Seal Plate may not be parallel to the hull bottom across its full span. For more information, refer to Section 5.
  2. If the Seal Plate is not parallel in the location needed, repeat Section 7, modifying the number of Wedge Plates until the correct angle has been achieved.
  3. Once fit is satisfactory, mark the alignment with a writing utensil on inboard and outboard sides of the Transom Plate to make the final mounting easier.
  4. Remove the Seal Plate from the Wedge Pack using the six (6) M6-1.0 x 30 mm bolts and washers (eight [8] on a 600 mm Controller).

10. Drill for Cable Entry

Drill for Cable Entry Introduction

The Seakeeper Ride system can be installed on a variety of boats with different space and size constraints for the Actuator Cable entry. Based on the selection of cable entry determined in Section 5.7, follow either Section 10.1 for Concealed Cable Entry or Section 10.2 for Exposed Cable Entry.

10.1. Concealed Cable Entry

The cable routing can be concealed if the hull structure allows for it. Follow this procedure for mounting the supplied protective conduit for the Actuator cable.

  1. Check for available space on the interior of the hull and clean access to the transom prior to starting the Concealed Cable Entry procedure. Verify there is no structure or cable in the way of either inboard or outboard oval hole location of the Wedge Pack Assembly.
  2. Assemble the Drill Guide by placing the Drill Guide Tube inside of the follower with the rounded part of the tube on the outer diameter of the follower, as shown below. The tube should telescope in and out of the follower freely.
Figure 39 – Drill Guide
  1. Leave the Wedge Pack in place as fitted during Section 9.
  2. Place the Drill Guide Assembly in one of the oval cable ports in the Wedge Pack Assembly as shown below.
  3. The inboard or outboard oval cable port in the Wedge Pack Assembly can be used depending on available inboard space.
Figure 40 – Drill Guide Insert into Wedge Pack.
  1. Press the face of the Drill Guide flush with the transom of the boat. Use this to create a 1/4 in. (6.4 mm) pilot hole in the transom.
  2. Remove the Drill Guide.
  3. Loosen the positioning screws that are holding the Wedge Pack in place, then remove the Wedge Pack Assembly.
  4. Drill out the pilot hole to match the diameter of the Cable Gland with a 23/32 in. (19 mm) drill bit.
  5. Apply a liberal amount of sealant on the outer diameter of the Cable Gland tube (See Figure 41, Left). Install the Cable Gland tube from the inboard side of the transom.
  6. Apply more sealant where the tube meets the outboard side of the transom (See Figure 41, Center and Right).
Figure 41 – Sealant Application to Cable Gland
  1. Install the Nut on the outboard side of the transom. Do not overtighten.
Figure 42 – Outboard Cable Gland Nut Installation
  1. Cut off the excess threads on the outboard side off using a hacksaw or oscillating tool.
Figure 43 – Cable Gland Trimming

10.2. Exposed Cable Entry

In the instance in which the Actuator cable will be exposed, follow this procedure for mounting the supplied protective conduit for the Actuator cable.

  1. Check for structural clearances and rigging inside the hull before proceeding with drilling holes for the cable route in the transom.
  2. Determine the ideal location where the cable will penetrate the hull based on Section 5.7
  3. Using 23/32 in. (19 mm) drill-bit or hole saw, drill a hole through the transom.
  4. Apply a liberal amount of sealant on the outer diameter of the gland. Install the Cable Gland tube from the inside (Figure 41 – Sealant Application to Cable Gland).
  5. Install the Nut on the outboard side of the transom. Do not overtighten (Figure 42 – Outboard Cable Gland Nut Installation).
  6. Cut off the excess threads on the outboard side using a hacksaw or oscillating tool (Figure 43 – Cable Gland Trimming).
  7. Hold the Inner Cable guide up to the Cable Gland in the desired mounting location. Mark the locations of the two (2) mounting screws and drill 3/32 in. (2.4 mm) pilot holes in these locations.
Figure 44 – Inner Cable Guide in Place for Pilot Holes
  1. Inject sealant in both pilot holes. Use a screwdriver to install the two (2) No. 8 x 1-1/2 in. screws to mount the Inner Cable Guide.
  2. Place the Outer Cable Guide over the Inner Cable Guide. Mark the location of the six (6) mounting screw holes. Drill 3/32 (2.4 mm) pilot holes in these six (6) locations. Note: Do not install the Outer Cable Guide at this time.
Figure 45 – Outer Cable Guide in Place for Pilot Holes

11. Mount Wedge Pack

Mount Wedge Pack Introduction

Care must be taken to ensure clean working conditions. Wearing clean gloves is highly recommended to keep caustic substances off skin and prevent oil and grease from getting on adhesive surfaces.

11.1. Prepare Parts and Hull

  1. Wipe the area to be bonded with acetone or denatured alcohol and plain white paper towels.
  2. Replace the tape around the border of the abraded portion of the transom where the Transom Plate will be mounted. Mask around the mounting location as well as the bottom of the boat. The tape will help keep the surrounding gelcoat clean of adhesive. The inside of the Cable Gland should be covered to avoid adhesive from entering the gland, particularly when installing with a Concealed Cable Entry as indicated in Section 10.1.
Figure 46 – Tape Masking off Gel Coat
  1. Tape the top and side edges of the Wedge Pack Assembly. Note: The drain holes on the Wedge Pack Assembly, circled in Figure 44 must be covered with tape to avoid adhesive clogging them.
Figure 47 – Drain Hole in Wedge Pack
  1. Wipe the Wedge Pack down with acetone or denatured alcohol using plain white paper towels to remove oil/surface contaminates.

11.2. Sand Adhered Surface

  1. Using 60 grit sandpaper, scuff the entire back and bottom of the Transom Plate by hand. You may use a Dual Action Sander (DA), but you must be extremely careful not to remove excess material. DO NOT use a grinder or heavy abrasive for this process. The mounting surface of the Transom Plate should have a matte gray finish when properly prepared with sandpaper. Note: Be careful not to sand down the standoff bumps on the plate circled in blue below.
Figure 48 – Sanding Transom Plate
Figure 49 – Standoff Bumps (Circled in Blue) Are Not to Be Sanded

11.3. Clean Adhered Surfaces

  1. Wipe the Wedge Pack down with acetone or denatured alcohol and plain white paper towels a second time to remove oil and/or surface contaminates after sanding.
  2. Clean the transom mounting location with acetone or denatured alcohol and plain white paper towels a second time to remove oil and/or surface contaminates after sanding.

11.4. Mount Wedge Pack

  1. Apply a generous layer of adhesive to both the Transom Plate and transom as shown below The Transom Plate has three (3) stand offs to allow for adequate adhesive thickness once mounted. Note: Work from this point on should be deliberate, keeping in mind the working time of the adhesive being applied. Warmer temperatures reduce working time.
Figure 50 – Adhesive on Wedge Pack and Transom
  1. Install the Wedge Pack Assembly by sliding the keyholes over the positioning screws. Excess adhesive should appear around the entire perimeter of the Wedge Pack Assembly as the Wedge Pack is pressed into place.

11.5. Confirm Location

  1. Add the Seal Plate to the assembly to check its position as indicated in Section 9. Insert the six (6) M6-1.0 x 30 mm bolts and washers to hold the Seal Plate, as shown below. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] bolts and washers.) Note: Apply thread locking sealant, but do not apply the final torque during this step.
Figure 51 – Seal Plate Temporary Installation
  1. Using a straight edge, verify the Wedge Pack is parallel with the hull bottom in the desired location as determined in Section 5. Due to different hull shapes and features, the Seal Plate may not be parallel to the hull bottom across its full span.
Figure 52 – Seal Plate Alignment Confirmation
  1. Once the position is confirmed, remove the Seal Plate, and tighten the positioning screws with a Phillips head screwdriver. The screws must be tight enough to press out excess adhesive and keep the assembly from sagging, but do not overtighten or the transom plate may crack.

Note: In the uncommon case that the measured transom angles for the inboard and outboard sides of a Controller location (found in Section 6.1) are greater than 2 degrees apart, tighten beginning on the side with the larger transom angle pulling it tight to the transom. On the side with the smaller transom angle, gently advance the screws but do not tighten it all the way to the transom. If the screws on the side of the smaller transom angle are overtightened, the Wedge Pack will warp and cause issues. Be sure there is enough methacrylate adhesive between the Transom Plate and the transom for a strong bond with no voids.

11.6. Fair in Excess Glue

  1. Using a squeegee, putty knife, or tongue depressor, fill in the gap between the running surface of the hull and the Actuator Plate with excess adhesive, as shown below. Apply extra adhesive as needed.
Figure 53 – Adhesive Filling Between Hull Bottom and Actuator Plate
  1. The smooth transition from the hull bottom to the Seal Plate is critical for achieving the best performance out of the system.
  2. Using a squeegee, putty knife, or tongue depressor, clean away excess adhesive.
  3. Fillet excess adhesive on the upper edges of the Transom Plate to the transom. Apply extra adhesive as needed.
  4. Remove the masking tape from the Wedge Pack Assembly and transom. If needed, clean any excess adhesive using acetone or denatured alcohol and plain white paper towels.
  5. Allow resin to cure before proceeding. Some adhesives have ‘handling times’ where the product feels firm but is not ready for loading. Some adhesives also have required times before submersion. Please follow the adhesive manufacturer’s instructions.
  6. After fairing, check that the drain hole has remained clear. See Figure 47.

12. Actuator and Blade Installation

Actuator and Blade Installation Introduction

The final stages of installation are differentiated by the cable entry into the hull. If you are following a concealed cable entry, follow the procedure detailed in Section 12.1. For exposed cable entry, follow procedure in Section 12.2.

Note: Do not bend the Actuator Cable at a radius smaller than 50 mm (1.97 in.) to avoid damaging the cable.

12.1. Concealed Cable Entry

  1. Align the Actuator so the cable passes through the hole in the Wedge Pack Assembly and the Cable Gland. Feed the Actuator Cable through the Cable Gland and remove as much slack from the outboard side as possible.
  2. Slide the Seal Plate over the Actuator and fasten it to the Wedge Pack Assembly using the six (6) M6-1.0 x 30 mm bolts and washers, as shown below. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] bolts and washers.) Note: Apply thread locking sealant, but do not apply the final torque during this step.
Figure 54 – Seal Plate Installation on Actuator
  1. Install the six (6) M6-1.0 x 16 mm Allen head screws on the underside of the Seal Plate. Torque all screws to 50 in-lbs. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] screws.)
Figure 55 – Seal Plate Bottom Screw Installation
  1. Torque the six (6) upper front bolts to 50 in-lbs (5.7 N-m) (eight [8] on a 600 mm Controller).
  2. Tighten the Cable Gland on the inboard side of the transom. The Cable Gland should be snug to prevent leaking, but do not overtighten. Gently pull on the cable to ensure there is no movement and prove it is sealing securely.

Note: The Cable Gland must have the rubber grommet in place to properly seal. The outside of the cable must be clean of debris, dust, adhesives, etc. to properly seal. Do not allow acetone to come in contact with the Controller Cable Gland Sealing Nut.

Figure 56 – Cable Gland Installation Inboard of Transom
  1. Install the Blade to the Actuator Arms using the four (4) M8-1.25 x 20 mm screws and their washers. Torque these four (4) bolts to 80 in-lbs (9.0 N-m) in an ‘X’ pattern.
Figure 57 – Blade Installation
  1. Once installed, push the Blade all the way down and verify that the Blade is not contacting the Seal Plate. There should be a small, even gap between them.

Note: If the gap between the Blade and Seal Plate is too large, system performance will fall off. If the Blade contacts the Seal Plate, the friction will slow down the system’s response time, also reducing performance. Do not apply anti-fouling coating to the surfaces between the Blade and Seal Plate in order to avoid changing the fit of those parts, and be attentive to keeping those surfaces clean to maintain the factory fitment.

12.2. Exposed Cable Entry

  1. Install the Cable Guide Support in the groove in the Seal Plate.
Figure 58 – Cable Guide Support in Groove
  1. Install the Actuator in the Seal Plate. Route the Actuator Cable through the Cable Guide Support.
  2. Slide the Seal Plate and Actuator Assembly onto the Wedge Pack Assembly and fasten it using the six (6) M6-1.0 x 30 mm bolts and washers as shown in Figure 54 – Seal Plate Installation on Actuator. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] bolts and washers.) Note: Apply thread locking sealant, but do not apply the final torque at this time.
  3. Install the six (6) M6-1.0 x 16 mm Allen Head Screws on the underside of the Seal Plate. (600 mm Controllers will have eight [8] screws.) Torque all screws to 50 in-lbs (5.7 N-m). See Figure 55 – Seal Plate Bottom Screw Installation.
  4. Torque the six (6) upper front bolts to 50 in-lbs (5.7 N-m) (eight [8] on a 600 mm Controller).
  5. Mount the Cable Guide Support in line with the natural path of the Actuator Cable to the transom. Pre-drill two (2) mounting screw pilot holes using a 3/32 in. (2.4 mm) bit. Inject sealant into the holes. Insert two (2) No. 8 x 0.75 in. screws and tighten with a Phillips head screwdriver.
Figure 59 – Cable Guide Pilot Holes
  1. Route the Actuator cable over the Inner Cable Guide. Feed as much cable as possible through the Cable Gland Tube.
  2. Tighten the Cable Gland around the Actuator Cable on the inboard side of the transom (See Figure 56 – Cable Gland Installation Inboard of Transom). The Cable Gland should be snug to prevent leaking, but do not overtighten. If the Cable Gland was not selected, apply marine adhesive sealant to the cable sheath and cable hole to seal the penetration from outside the hull.
  3. Inject sealant into the pilot holes for the mounting screws for the Outer Cable Guide. Using a Phillips head screwdriver, install the six (6) mounting screws into the hull and hand-tighten (See Figure 45 – Outer Cable Guide in Place for Pilot Holes).
  4. Install the Blade to the Actuator Arms using the four (4) M8-1.25×20 mm screws and their washers. Torque these four (4) bolts to 80 in-lbs (9.0 N-m) in an ‘X’ pattern (Figure 57 – Blade Installation).
  5. Once installed, push the Blade all the way down and verify that the Blade is not contacting the Seal Plate. There should be a small, even gap between them.

Note: If the gap between the Blade and Seal Plate is too large, system performance will fall off. If the Blade contacts the Seal Plate, the friction will slow down the system’s response time, also reducing performance. Do not apply anti-fouling coating to the surfaces between the Blade and Seal Plate in order to avoid changing the fit of those parts, and be attentive to keeping those surfaces clean to maintain the factory fitment.